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a little bit of a gamble, if you will, and go on the technology -- technological information we have as to where our crime was most occurring. we put the cops there and we've been fortunate to be able to keep the fatal gun and homicide countdown. ~ count down. so, with that -- >> chief, if i may, some of the statistics you just described are incredibly important to sucres for the public because i think a lot of times members of the public, they wonder why there aren't more patrol officers, why there's not more traffic enforcement, et cetera. a lot of times people don't fully understand how problematic it wattx of so many years we didn't have police academy classes and we saw the department strained, about 300 short right now. ~ so, that's why it was so positive that the mayor put three academy classes per year in the budget last year and made a commitment, i know, i believe and hope that the board has the same commitment to consistently fund three academy classes per year. because even with turning it around like we're trying to do, it's goingic to like another five years for the dep
's really about technology. because none of these unconventional shale plays would matter if we didn't have the tech to make it economical to drill it. what we really have is an energy technology revolution and these advances aren't unique to north america. they're spreading all over the globe, and who's spearheading this transformation? who represents the vanguard of the oil revolution and its intellectual property? easy. that's core labs. clb. i like to think of it as a technology company that happens to be in the oil service business. core's proprietary technology helps oil companies figure out where to drill. it also helps them squeeze more crude out of existing reservoirs. now, core labs got hit hard today, down $3.41, 2.63%. the company just reported a terrific quarter. 7 cent earnings beat off $1.15 basis. revenue coming in higher than expected up 11% year over year. and raising its guidance for next quarter. don't have a lot of companies doing that. i think the stock bounces back and then some tomorrow. typically core labs is one of those stocks that seems to get hit every tile time
-year communication and technology plan for fiscal year 2013-2014 through fiscal year 2017-18 pursuant to administrative code section 22a.6. >> president chiu. >> thank you, mr. chair. again, i want to thank the members of the budget committee for the consideration and support of the five-year information and communication technology plan which i had several years ago in legislation asked that our city's i-t staff put together so that we can have a framework about how we plan invest in technology. and i do support the plan as it's laid out. one thing i would just notice, though, for colleagues is that over the next five years we have about $200 million of capital needs that we have within our ict areas and i think it's important for us to think about that, to think about how we can make government more efficient and effective through the use of technology, and to do this in a way that really increases public access and transparency. but all that being said, colleagues, i hope that you will be able to support this plan and i want to haltake a moment to thank the members of coyt and i-t
was she was telling us to go forward 2030 in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we'
the impacts of extreme weather events, clean energy technologies and the threats of rising temperatures across the country. in contrast, we are not aware of any republican member who has spoken on the house floor about the dangers of climate change and the committee of jurisdiction is not even willing to hold a hearing to hear what the scientists and experts have to say about the issue. i have a message to house republicans, you can't make climate change go away by ignoring the problem. . . . the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from washington rise? mrs. mcmorris rodgers: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. mcmorris rodgers: thank you, madam speaker. today, our hearts remain heavy -- our hearts are heavy for those who lost their lives on monday's unspeakable act of violence. for those who remain in critical condition, for the parents who lost their 8-year-old son, and for the families whose loved ones never came home from the boston marathon. while our sorrow is great, so, too, is o
? is there facial recognition technology? or do they have to rely on people saying i know that guy? >> there is facial recognition technology, but to tell you the truth, honestly, when i was in a little kid i met a hero detective who solved a very tough case involving a sniper and i said how did you do it? and he wrote something that i can't repeat on the air, but it was basically knock on doors and get off of your derriere. facial recognition can only take you so far. i think it will be a member of the public. the reporting has been extraordinary, i think cnn, you guys, fox and msnbc have really done a very good job. and part of that is getting evidence in there that they think is important but when strung together it will come together, but is a very human intensive process. all of the photographs and video, really have to go through a set of eyes not a computer. >> michael: yeah, and that's amazing, and of course that's why we had you on brian, to talk about exactly how good of job we have done covering this story. but we really appreciate your input, beca
-yah to ya! >> hey, sunshine, what's shaking? >> caller: not much, man. my stock is arine technology. unfortunately, i got it when the company went public on the ipo day. what do you think about this? >> i was surprised the stock didn't act better, given how many ipo positive initiations there were today. i think the stock is a buy. i like that kind of programmatic advertising business for the web. i think you trade this thing up to 16, 17. i think you've got some room to run. all right. lots of ipos on the horizon. you know i'm liking this black hawk and seaworld. remember, not to chase in the after market, but slow and steady safeway is a good alternative if you can't get into black hawk. and you know what, fairway, real good produce. don't go anywhere. "lightning round" is coming up next. >>> it is time! it is time for the "lightning round" on cramer's "mad money." my staff prepares the graphics. when you hear this sound, the lightning round is over. are you ready, skedaddy? i want to start with joey in wisconsin. >> caller: hey, jim, you do a great job on "squawk on the street."
people off. your technology coordinator lost his job and that might not be legal >> good morning. i'm a student at city college. i want to voice my opinion on the accreditation related to city college. i wanted to give a little bit of my story are city college has given me a second chance out of high school i wasn't prepared to go straight into a four-year but the city college has provided that he with that. i'm on track. and i've bend so much and if we continue to put education, you know, aside, you know, a lot of people, you know, have the are smart and capable, you know, we're going to be i guess not giving them the opportunity to succeed. and some of the city colleges are producing some the leader and many of my peers are going on to higher institutions. so, please keep city college in mind >> good morning, mr. chairman. i'm not going to sing to you but it's a real pleasure to address i today. as it was said it was approved by over 70 percent of san franciscans. i'm talking to you as a instructor. i want you to use the parcel taxes to be used for that purpose. it says that the
with the technology knowledge. 1:26a.m. someone cut fiberoptic cables. first knocking out several 911 dispatch systems including gilroy's emergency police line which is still now. a moment later another cable cut sent phone and data systems down. >> they knew where to go for the fiberoptic, they knew where to cut. they also were able to take out very critical parts of the pg & e substation. >> reporter: the attacker used a high powered rifle, 30 to 40 shots. severely damaging five transmission banks at the sub station. pg & e said no one lost power. but they're asking the south bay to conserve power at least through midnight tonight as a precaution. reporting live in santa clara county, john fowler. >>> more sunshine and even warmerweather. i'll detail how high temperatures will climb. >> what goes on where your food is prepared. the app that will help you uncover your favorite restaurant's dirty little secret. >>> is the bombing in boston a wake up call for the bay area. >> if a natural disaster or terrorist attack happened here in the bay area. are the cities preparedded? i'll tell you the first rer
it wasn't just the fire department alone. it took a lot of work from the department of technology to the department of city planning, i saw brian strong here early and ken rich from the mayor's office. a whole host of people, and we have john green who is our department captain, who earlier this morning gave a very special blessing upstairs in the dining facility to all the members at station 1 and for blessing this building and all the work done here. few other folks that i would like to acknowledge, local 798, the men and women presented by tom o'connor behind me, thank you, tom. as well as some of his members of the executive board here, thanks very much to local 798. there is two retired deputies here. i have seen this happen. i'm grateful they came back because it's this early phase, he got us where we are at today. thank you very much. [ applause ] and also retired deputy chief of operation patrick guard who was a member of station one 1 gaevend us -- gave us a lot of input. most of my command staff is behind me. just like when you go out and run a call you count on each ot
and can only respond to known threats. cyberthreats evolve at the speefed technology and this measure helps the private sector protect against cyberattacks by providing companies with the latest cyberthreat information from the intelligence community which has timely classified information about destructive malware. this cyberthreat intelligence is the information that companies and the government need to protect and defend their networks. the so-called signatures are primarily made up of numerical codes consisting of zeros and ones without any perm information attached. -- any personal information atammed. cispa is a result of cooperation between the community, companies and to a certain degree the white house as it pertains to many measures included in this legislation. during their efforts to improve the bill, they also maintain a dialogue with privacy advocates in an effort to strengthen civil liberties, protections and oversights. i had a personal note here for the reason that over a period of 10 years i served eight of those years on the intelligence committee. and the now chair
that bullying now doesn't happen just in schools. with the internet and all of the technology that we have, it can happen anywhere. so thank you so much for being here, it's a great honor to host you here and i look forward to a very engaging conversation today. thank you. >> now i want to tell you my fae vifrt very favorite department of justice official. eric holder is my favorite department of justice official. tom perez is my second favorite department of justice official. we are very honored today that tom perez has come from washington, dc, to give welcoming remarks here at this summit. tom perez is the assistant attorney general of the civil rights division in washington, dc, he was nominated for that position by president obama and sworn in in october of 2009 and we are all the lucky -- we are all very lucky that that happened in october of 2009. tom has spent his entire career in public service and on protecting the civil rights of our most vulnerable people. tom actually joined the civil rights division as a young lawyer and while he was there he prosecuted some of the most
of technology says that early education baits boosts the economy by providing jobs to nearly 3 million people nationwide. ~ those people then spend their wages and pay taxes. by increasing the time, income, and resources for parents and caregivers of young children, we are building a solid foundation for lifelong development. children who attend early education programs have the benefit of relating to other students which can increase their social skills. children who have experience early childhood education are more socially competent in their preschool, kindergarten and school age years. in san francisco we still need over 15,000 slots for infants and preschool combined. there are approximately 36,785 children under the age of 13 and families with income levels eligible for child care subsidies. though children represent 42% of the city's child population. the need is great and it's unfulfilled right now. teachers and caregivers who provide our children with lifelong skills are invaluable to our society and we need to value and recognize their tremendous worth. today there are over 2000 ea
crossed. tens of thousands were stranded yesterday by a large technology meltdown. the airline is hoping for near normal operations today. we are in washington, dc, with the latest. >> good morning, kristen, a huge mess for american airlines. their systems are up and running this morning but the impact of the massive computer meltdown is still being felt today and some are even experiencing long lines at american airlines counters this morning. >> american airlines hopes to get the planes off the ground today but will not be running at full speed saying they fix add problem with the computer network that left tens of thousands of passengers stranded. still, there is a backlog after they ground all of the planes. >> waiting to see what is happen ing. we don't know what will happen. >> from dallas to chicago to miami, planes sat on the tarmac and passengers waited in long lines. in all, 1,000 flights were canceled and hundreds more were delayed. >> the positive aspect is everyone has been pleasant. not so great is we have no idea when we will get home. >> the computer meltdown left agents
investment in renewable and energy. give the benefit of the technology got when they were young industry. >> is it the anticipation in the next ten or fifteen years that all of the renewables will be able to catch up in surpass what is currently with oil, gas, and coal. >> over time. >> i have no problem with wind and hydroelectricity and solar. the assumption that we're going take away normal business expense from oil and gas and coal which will slow down the reduction and increase price. the same as the cigarette tax currently in the budget actually said we want to decrease usage by increasing the price. we get rid of revenue. it seems to be the same with oil, gas, and coal. we increase the price at the pump or home heating oil or electricity increase the price of those and try to supplement off to other areas which every economist i've seen deals with energy economy said those technologies probably not for thirty years or more to get close it catching up. 9 percent of the portfolio we supplement the other 1eu89%. >> i don't think the proposal on oil and gas industry work. i would be h
facebook worked hard to get a provision in the reform bill that will be helpful to technology companies. the proposed new rules would allow facebook and other high- tech companies to avoid a requirement that they make a good faith effort to recruit americans for jobs before hiring foreign workers. the high-tech industry has long complained about a shortage of qualified engineers and other high-skilled workers here in the u.s. >>> america is footing most of the bill when it comes to overseas military bases. the senate armed services committee has found the u.s. is paying $10 billion a year to operate bases in countries including germany, japan and south korea. the report outlines problems in getting compensations from other countries and the pentagon may close some bases to save money. >>> the distinguished warfare medal was approved by leon panetta, and some lawmakers were concerned that the medal would be placed above those for battlefield valor. chuck hagel nixed the medal in favor of in addition to existing medals. >>> he's trying to rebuild a tainted political career. but now mark s
. and you look at that. she's shutting that app down taking that technology and using it in some other form. can she really create value that way? >> she's looking to do small acquisitions of talent that will cost in the low tens of millions. those type of deals. by in large yahoo! has great assets and they have a brand name so a lot of it is really just taking what they have and taking engineers they have and improving the use case for yahoo! on mobile which in marissa's words incorporates checking news, weather, sports, those are things people do on their phones and they need to be there and get it right. it's a combination of small acquisitions. >> one final question and we'll let you go. you give her eight quarters. that's a long honeymoon in wall street land. does the rest of the world give her that much time? >> i think it's probably shorter than that in terms of the new products. i think six to eight quarters from the time she started in order to really have some good new products that are working and driving and then first users and engagement and then monetization because unless yo
of the issues we have looked at and there are ways technology-wise to do checks. this legislation does not move in that direction. it is the opposite, prohibiting a national registry so that information about themselves are not made public and not controlled by government. they are controlled by the person who sells the gun, so therefore there is no record of gun ownership and that is specifically admitted under current law and the bills we are taking up today. the suggestion you are making is one we have had in the past. i do not think there is the legislative support to move that type of proposal, but i agree with you that it is worthy to take a look at. look at both sides had right now there is a missed trust of what government will do with that information. those answers need to be -- questions need to be answered. host: from twitter, the fact that it will not stop all people from getting guns is a weak excuse. let me put another issue on the table. you serve on the foreign affairs committee and this is the headline in the international section of "the new york times." government will do wi
shows in terms of sales volume, and we all know how we're using our technology more and more every day for our personal lives and how we defend on it. for example, the national shooting sports foundation surveyed owners of modern sporting rifles in 2010 and found that 10% of them, 10% of all rifles sold had purchased their firearms at gun shows, whereas 25% had purchased them online. 25%. believe me, i understand the political stakes for my colleagues and i sympathize. i have been there. i understand it. and comes from states like west virginia, and no state has a higher regard for the second amendment rights to bear arms than my state. in fact, on the great seal of the state of west virginia, the preamble is montani sember liberai. in latin, that means mountaineers are always free. you know how we feel. one of the review states that became a state during the civil war, broke away from virginia at that time. but west virginians are also guided by a little common sense. i have said this. in west virginia, we know what nonsense is, we know what common sense is, and now we know what gun s
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20